EU Offering Bounties up to $100,000

In an attempt to bolster the security of many open source tools used by governments within the EU, an initiative called the Free and Open Source Software Audit project (FOSSA) has put up rewards from €25,000 to €90,000. The bounty can be claimed by anyone who is able to find a significant vulnerability in the software.

The software selected was all open source software (meaning anyone can contribute to the development of the software) including some programs that are widely used by individuals and governments alike.

The list included: 7-zip, Apache Kafka, Apache Tomcat, Digital Signature Services (DSS), Drupal, Filezilla, FLUX TL, the GNU C Library (glibc), KeePass, Notepad++, PuTTY, PHP Symfony, VLC Media Player and WSO2.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2018/12/30/eu-bug-bounty-for-open-source-tools/

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Bangladesh Shuts Down Mobile Internet

In an attempt to to prevent rumors and propaganda, a Bangladeshi telecom regulator has ordered mobile phone operators to shut down all high speed (3G and 4G) networks.

Critics have accused the current government of curtailing free speech and dissent, including through anti-press laws that have become more strict this year.

Many countries are considering measures to protect elections from interference, however some may see this move as going too far.

Article source: https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/12/bangladesh-shuts-mobile-internet-lead-election-day-181229111353218.html

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Why Bitcoin Matters for Freedom

The linked Time magazine article speaks to one of the many benefits of bitcoin over government backed currency. Although bitcoin greatest strength is a fixed supply, it can also be used for censorship resistance in corrupt or authoritarian regimes.

Unlike government currencies which allow unlimited printing, which primarily goes to the rich and people connected to the government while stealing from everyday savers. This system rewards the rich with free currency and the poor with more debt. Bitcoin being money (having a limited supply) does not have these downfalls, and rewards savers instead.

This article shows how bitcoin is being used by Venezuelans to escape hyperinflation and monetary controls stoping them from accessing their currency. It shows how this could be used to protect citizens from authoritarian regimes.

Article source: http://time.com/5486673/bitcoin-venezuela-authoritarian/

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UK's 5G Network has Huawei equipment, this is why they are removing it

Huawei is coming under more scrutiny, as potential ties to the Chinese government may have caused the equipment that the company produces to be compromised.

Due to these concerns the equipment is being removed from the company BT’s cellular network. Additionally, it was confirmed that the equipment was being removed from the UK emergency services.

With backdoors and cyber espionage becoming common place, more attention may have to be paid to how we regulate and reduce government spying.

Article source: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-46690627

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Uber Fined $460k For Data Breach

European countries are fining Uber with a penalty for the way it handled a 2016 data breach. According to TechCruch, this breach could have been avoided if Uber didn’t store their AWS login information in plain text on GitHub. Making two-factor authentication mandatory for the private GitHub repositories may have also prevented the issue.

Article source: https://techcrunch.com/2018/12/20/french-data-protection-watchdog-fines-uber-460000-for-data-breach/

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Data Privacy Vs. Data Protection: The Distinction In Defending Your Data

With the high frequency of data breaches in the Information Age, not many people actually understand the key concepts concerned with data storage, such as the difference between data privacy and data protection.
This article elaborates on the distinction between data privacy and data protection, as well as the importance of having the needed systems to protect digital assets.

Article source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2018/12/19/data-privacy-vs-data-protection-understanding-the-distinction-in-defending-your-data/

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Senate Democrats Launch New Privacy Effort to Protect Consumer Data

Senate Democrats introduced a new bill that would require any company that collects users digital data to treat that information with the same care that’s required from doctors, lawyers, and bankers. The new privacy bill won support from civil society groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Center for Democracy and Technology.

Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/paloma/the-cybersecurity-202/2018/12/18/the-cybersecurity-202-senate-democrats-launch-new-privacy-effort-to-protect-consumer-data/5c17d9e91b326b2d6629d4cd/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.a53ebbc6cca2

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Facebook's Latest Breach Illustrates The Limits Of GDPR

According to this article, Facebook had a data breach that allowed the private photos of up to 6.8 million users to be improperly accessible to many different applications for nearly two weeks before the company noticed the security lapse and fixed it. Furthermore, it took Facebook almost three months to notify the General Data Protection Regulation agency about the breach, disregarding their 72-hour notification requirement. GDPR regulations have their limitations, especially if they may not have been implemented correctly.

Article source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/kalevleetaru/2018/12/14/facebooks-latest-breach-illustrates-the-limits-of-gdpr/#5106c6b274a5

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Australia's New Anti-Encryption Law is Extremely Unpopular

The Australian government has passed a law that forces tech companies to give law enforcement access to encrypted messages. The law is widely disliked by the technology industry, especially Apple who has been a long term proponent of privacy. The point is made that security experts believe so-called "backdoors" will allow the law enforcement to spy on normal people in addition to criminals. Designing a system in a way where there is a master key to decrypt everything (backdoor) may weaken the security of the system as a whole.

Article source: https://www.businessinsider.com/australia-spy-chief-is-defending-tola-act-an-unpopular-anti-encryption-law-2018-12

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Affected by the Marriott Data Breach? Here is What to do.

If you are one of the 327 million guests affected in the Marriott hotels data breach, this article provides tips on how to further protect yourself from a possible identity theft and misuse of your personal information.

Article source: https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/30/tech/marriott-breach-what-to-do/index.html

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New Bill Passed in Australia Destroying Privacy - Forcing Tech Firms to Allow Spying on Your Encrypted Data

Under the guise of giving their security agencies the extra tools needed, the Australian government passed a draconian law where companies will be obligated to hand over your encrypted data (linked to suspected activity) and could be fined up to 10 million Australian dollars if they fail to. This is the latest in the move of many governments to sacrifice freedom for a false sense of security.

Article source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-security-data/australia-poised-to-force-tech-firms-to-hand-over-encrypted-data-idUSKBN1O42SR

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Race to Protect Against A Future With Quantum Computing

This article states that the worlds biggest technology companies are competing to protect themselves from the first quantum computer. In theory a quantum computer would be far more powerful than current day computers, being able to break most encryption algorithms we use to protect everything from governments to banks. While building quantum computers is still far from happening, China has become a leader in quantum encryption (encryption algorithms that are less susceptible to quantum computing because of their fundamental design) and the Chinese government has made different kinds of quantum research a priority.

Article source: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/03/technology/quantum-encryption.html

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